Data for Good in Bangalore

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Miriam Young is a Communications Specialist at DataKind.

At DataKind, we believe the same algorithms and computational techniques that help companies generate profit can help social change organizations increase their impact. As a global nonprofit, we harness the power of data science in the service of humanity by engaging data scientists and social change organizations on projects designed to address critical social issues.

Our global Chapter Network recently wrapped up a marathon of DataDives, helping local organizations with their data challenges over the course of a weekend. This post highlights two of the projects from DataKind Bangalore’s first DataDive earlier this year, where volunteers used data science to help support rural agriculture and combat urban corruption.

Digital Green

Founded in 2008, Digital Green is an international, nonprofit development organization that builds and deploys information and communication technology to amplify the effectiveness of development efforts to affect sustained social change. They have a series of educational videos of agricultural best practices to help farmers in villages succeed.

The Challenge

Help farmers more easily find videos relevant to them by developing a recommendation engine that suggests videos based on open data on local agricultural conditions. The team was working with a collection of videos, each focused on a specific crop, along with descriptions, but each description was in a different regional language. The challenge, then, was parsing and interpreting this information to use it as as a descriptive feature for the video. To add another challenge, they needed geodata with the geographical boundaries of different regions to map the videos to a region with specific soil types and environmental conditions, but the data didn’t exist.

The Solution

The volunteers got to work preparing this dataset and published boundaries of 103,344 indian villages and geocoded 1062 Digital Green villages in Madhya Pradesh(MP) to 22 soil polygons. They then clustered MP districts into 5 agro-climatic clusters based on 179 feature vectors, mapping villages that Digital Green works with into these agro-climatic clusters. Finally, the team developed a Hinglish parser that parses the Hindi titles of available videos and translates them to English to help the recommender system understand which crop the videos relate to.

I Change My City / Janaagraha

Janaagraha was established in 2001 as a nonprofit that aims to combine the efforts of the government and citizens to ensure better quality of life in cities by improving urban infrastructure, services and civic engagement. Their civic portal, IChangeMyCity promotes civic action at a neighborhood level by enabling citizens to report a complaint that then gets upvoted by the community and flagged for government officials to take action.

The Challenge

Deal with duplicate complaints that can clog the system and identify factors that delay open issues from being closed out.

The Solution

To deal with the problem of duplicate complaints, the team used Jaccard similarity and Cosine similarity on vectorized complaints to cluster similar complaints together. Disambiguation was performed by ward and geography. The model they built delivered a precision of more than 90%.

To deal with the problem of identifying factors affecting closure by user and authorities, the team used two approaches. The first approach involved analysis using Decision Trees by capturing attributes like Comments, Vote-ups, Agency ID, Subcategory and so on. The second approach involved logistic regression to predict closure probability. Closure probability was modeled as a function of complaint subcategory, ward, comment velocity, vote-ups and similar other factors.

With these new features, iChangeMyCity will be able to better handle the large volume of incoming requests and Digital Green will be better able to serve farmers.

These initial findings are certainly valuable, but DataDives are actually much bigger than just weekend events. The weeks of preparation that go into them and months of impact that ripple out from them make them a step in an organization’s larger data science journey. This is certainly the case here, as both of these organizations are now exploring long-term projects with DataKind Bangalore to expand on this work.

Stay tuned for updates on these exciting projects to see what happens next!

Interested in getting involved? Find your local chapter and sign up to learn more about our upcoming events.

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